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gilt i'.4:.-iriti4:lll 4. litct *trill AI. No. XXV.] UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE CENTRAL NEGRO EMANCIPATION COMMITTEE.

gilt i'.4:.-iriti4:lll 4. litct *trill AI. No. XXV.] UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE CENTRAL NEGRO EMANCIPATION COMMITTEE.

gilt i' . 4:.-iriti4:lll 4 . litct *trill AI. No. XXV.] UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE CENTRAL NEGRO EMANCIPATION COMMITTEE. —(Loud cheers.) But I will not intrude on your precious time, and I have quite enough to do with my own. Rest assured that whenever and wherever the cause of fr
August 22, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
It has been justly observed that "liberty is an ever germinating principle," and I think the time has now arrived

It has been justly observed that "liberty is an ever germinating principle," and I think the time has now arrived

at which it is our bounden duty to lend all the aid in our power to those who are labouring for the overthrow of the monstrous evil in (-Aber parts of the world. I was told, when in New York, that many who had escaped from slavery in the Southern States, were actively occupied i
August 22, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
THE VERY SOLEMN PROTEST OF THE JAMAICA ASSEMBLY.

THE VERY SOLEMN PROTEST OF THE JAMAICA ASSEMBLY.

We would fain have recorded in this day's Emancipator every word of this most astounding document; and in conjunction with it, the concentration of caustip ridicule, and bitter, biting sarcasm, which has been so ably strung together in the form of a running commentary by Mr. E.
August 22, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
EFFECTS OF RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. Letter from E. B. Lyon, Esq., Special Justice, to the Rev. IV. ifnibb.

EFFECTS OF RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. Letter from E. B. Lyon, Esq., Special Justice, to the Rev. IV. ifnibb.

EFFECTS OF RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. Letter from E. B. Lyon, Esq., Special Justice, to the Rev. IV. Greenfield, Trelawny, July 10th, 1838. My dear Sir,—During the last four years, the performance of my duty as a Special Magistrate has brought me into intimate, indeed, I may say dail
October 3, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
3 5 0 9 15 0 21 13 4

3 5 0 9 15 0 21 13 4

Lll 11. 8 18 1 8 22 0 0 13 0 0
October 3, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
THE REV. W. KNIBB. From the same.

THE REV. W. KNIBB. From the same.

[The following are the terms in which the editor of this paper concludes his lying account of the design against Mr. Knibb's life, at Falmouth.] The. reverend demagogue then left the Court House, followed, as he had entered, by a crowd of men and women, hugging him up, and calli
October 3, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
Moutrotir. ADDRESS OF. THE FRENCH-ABOLITIONISTS. To the Abolitionists of Great Britain.

Moutrotir. ADDRESS OF. THE FRENCH-ABOLITIONISTS. To the Abolitionists of Great Britain.

ADDRESS OF. THE FRENCH-ABOLITIONISTS. To the Abolitionists of Great Britain. It is not without a sentiment of justifiable pride that we perceive the abolitionists of Great Britain, :who, by their indefatigable zeal and untiring energy in signalizing the evils of Slavery, and• its
October 3, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
CONTRACT LAWS.

CONTRACT LAWS.

The paramount necessity of a well digested law, I for the purpose of regulating contracts between masters and servants, has become obvious from the specimens of legislation which have been sent home ifrom the colonies, on this vital subject. To protect the emancipated negros fro
October 3, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
CAP. I.

CAP. I.

! Repeal the existing Law. Repeals all laws now in force relating to contracts, &c. This repeal not to affect existing contracts entered into previously to the taking effect of the Order_: in Council, of ,July 30,1838 ; but all Contracts liable to be set aside as hereinafter. st
October 3, 1838 - British Emancipator - London, London, England
 
into any defence! He knew too well, that if he were "as pure as ice, as chaste as snow," the

into any defence! He knew too well, that if he were "as pure as ice, as chaste as snow," the

portals of justice would be closed against him. His refusal to plead to the indictment was another sufficient reason to prejudice the judges of his motives. Another sacrifice was wanted, and who more fit than a Baptist leader? Can there be any wonder, then, that a verdict of gui
September 18, 1839 - British Emancipator - London, London, England